Indiana Couples Finish in Top Ten of Young Farmer Contests

first_img SHARE SHARE Home Indiana Agriculture News Indiana Couples Finish in Top Ten of Young Farmer Contests By Andy Eubank – Jan 17, 2013 There was no drive home to Indiana in a brand new pickup for the two Hoosier couples participating this week in American Farm Bureau’s Young Farmer and Rancher contests. John and Marybeth Feutz of Gibson County, competing in Excellence in Ag, and Orville and Jessica Haney of Kosciusko County competing for the Achievement Award made the top ten but that was the end of the road.Haney says just winning Indiana was a huge accomplishment.“It was one of the biggest honors of our lives. We’re just really happy to be here and then to be named top 10 in the nation was a big surprise.”John Feutz said “We’re just thrilled to be involved. It’s been a great experience and we’re glad to be top 10 in the country and that’s saying a lot when figure how big Farm Bureau is nationwide. So to be in the top 10 is great.”John and Marybeth Feutz 2nd and 3rd from rightHis wife Marybeth credited strong Indiana support for their success at getting to the top ten.“We had a packed house for our presentation and it was so wonderful to see so many smiling, friendly faces that were there to support us.”She says the support at the public presentation makes a difference.“Absolutely. With our theatre background we absolutely love playing to a full house. There’s so much positive energy and we really can feed back on that positive energy and channel that back into our presentation.”Young farmers will take a lot from the competition experience, and Orville and Jessica told HAT it starts right at the application process.“The application itself is 15-page odyssey of your goals and dreams and aspirations, and it’s a very nice outline of where you started and where you’re at now and where you want to go in the future. Just the practice of filling that thing out, they’re going to benefit from that.”Jessica agreed, telling HAT, “Hands down the application should be the thing that you enjoy most, getting your farm history down, writing your goals, brainstorming where are we going with this, where have we been. Seeing it all on paper is just so fulfilling.”[audio:https://www.hoosieragtoday.com//wp-content/uploads//2013/01/2013-YFandR-top-tens-from-Indiana.mp3|titles=2013 YFandR top tens from Indiana]Congratulations to both couples. Listen to the HAT interviews conducted in Nashville just after their final presentation/interview of the competition:John and Marybeth:[audio:https://www.hoosieragtoday.com//wp-content/uploads//2013/01/John-and-Marybeth-Feutz.mp3|titles=John and Marybeth Feutz]Orville and Jessica Haney:[audio:https://www.hoosieragtoday.com//wp-content/uploads//2013/01/Orville-and-Jessica-Haney.mp3|titles=Orville and Jessica Haney] Facebook Twitter Previous articleNCGA Priority and Policy Conference Wraps with USFRA PresentationNext articleSecretary Vilsack to Keynote Ethanol Conference Andy Eubank Facebook Twitter Indiana Couples Finish in Top Ten of Young Farmer Contestslast_img read more

Advanced Biofuel Pathway for Camelina Approved

first_img SHARE Advanced Biofuel Pathway for Camelina Approved The Environmental Protection Agency has finalized its rule approving camelina oil as a new low-carbon feedstock under the Renewable Fuel Standard. With camelina oil added to the growing list of biodiesel feedstocks that meet the EPA’s standards for advanced biofuel – National Biodiesel Board Vice President of Federal Affairs Anne Steckel says the decision provides another option for producing sustainable, domestic biodiesel that displaces imported oil. She says that’s important for our energy security, our economy and for addressing climate change.The RFS requires a 50-percent greenhouse-gas emissions reduction for qualifying biomass-based diesel or advanced biofuel. A comprehensive evaluation of the lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions of the renewable fuel as compared to the lifecycle emissions of the gasoline or diesel fuel that it replaces is required to determine if a fuel pathway meets that threshold. A handful of biodiesel feedstocks qualify as advanced under the program – including recycled cooking oil, soybean oil and animal fats.Source: NAFB News Service Facebook Twitter By Andy Eubank – Feb 26, 2013 Home Energy Advanced Biofuel Pathway for Camelina Approved Facebook Twitter SHARE Previous articleHearing on Mid-Level Ethanol Blends Doesn’t Include Ethanol IndustryNext articleBudget Views and Estimates Letter Adopted by House Ag Committee Andy Eubanklast_img read more

Renewables Make Up Nearly 90% of New Power in May

first_img Facebook Twitter Home Energy Renewables Make Up Nearly 90% of New Power in May SHARE Renewables Make Up Nearly 90% of New Power in May Facebook Twitter A new report shows that renewable energy sources made up nearly 90 percent of all new electrical generating capacity in the U.S. in May and more than half the new capacity this year so far. A news release from the SUN DAY Campaign, a non-profit research and educational organization that promotes sustainable energy technologies as cost-effective alternatives to nuclear power and fossil fuels, says that a new “Energy Infrastructure Update” report from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s Office of Energy Projects shows that wind, solar, biomass, and hydropower provided 88.2 percent of new installed U.S. electrical generating capacity for the month of May, and for the first five months of 2014, renewable energy sources accounted for 54.1 percent of the 3,136 MW of new domestic electrical generating installed.Since January 1, 2012, renewable energy sources have accounted for nearly half (47.83%) of all new installed U.S. electrical generating capacity followed by natural gas (38.34%) and coal (13.40%) with oil, waste heat, and “other” accounting for the balance.Renewable energy sources, including hydropower, now account for 16.28% of total installed U.S. operating generating capacity: water – 8.57%, wind – 5.26%, biomass – 1.37%, solar – 0.75%, and geothermal steam – 0.33%. This is more than nuclear (9.24%) and oil (4.03%) combined. *“Some are questioning whether it’s possible to satisfy the U.S. EPA’s new CO2 reduction goals with renewable energy sources and improved energy efficiency,” noted Ken Bossong, Executive Director of the SUN DAY Campaign.”The latest FERC data and the explosion of new renewable energy generating capacity during the past several years unequivocally confirm that it can be done.”You can read the full report here. By Gary Truitt – Jun 24, 2014 SHARE Previous articleIndiana Cattleman Attends Elite Beef Industry ConferenceNext articleA Stink over Cheese May Scuttle Trade talks Gary Truittlast_img read more

Making Soybeans More Profitable

first_img SHARE Previous articleStories of Stressed Farm Economy PersistNext articleMorning Outlook Gary Truitt Facebook Twitter SHARE Home Indiana Agriculture News Making Soybeans More Profitable By Gary Truitt – Apr 26, 2016 Facebook Twitter Making Soybeans More Profitable 4The soybean market looks to have a bit more upside potential than the corn market, as production problems in South America may reduce the estimated soybean ending stocks number. Our final April Better Farming segment looks at what Indiana farmers can do to make growing soybeans a more profitable crop.The video reports that aired in March and April focused on what growers can do to increase soybean production and profitability.  According to the research by Purdue’s Shawn Casteel, lowering plant population and planting earlier can significantly increase production while lowering costs. Economist Jim Mintert, with the Purdue Center for Commercial Agriculture, says what is needed is for growers to think about soybean production the way they think about corn production, “By that I mean better and more deliberate management. It is about seeding rate, using a planter rather than a drill, calibrating your planter correctly, assessing your field conditions; that is how we can lower our per bushel cost of producing soybeans.”Mintert says soybean yields have been steadily increasing and, with better management soybean production in Indiana, can continue to grow, “We have a lot more technology imbedded in those seeds today vs.2002. Our challenge is to find ways to reduce our cost per unit of output.”  Both Mintert and Casteel believe that better management is the key to reducing production costs while increasing soybean yields.In the May Better Farming reports, HAT will focus on what producers can do to maximize corn and soybean yields after the crop emerges.  Weed control is a major cost of production, and the failure to control weeks can reduce yields by as much as 30%.  In the May programs, the focus will be on how producers can control weeds and control costs.Be watching for our next Better Farming video report online at Hoosier Ag Today.com. The Better Farming reports are sponsored by the Indiana Soybean Checkoff and produced in cooperation with the Purdue Center for Commercial Agriculture.The soybean market looks to have a bit more upside potential than the corn market, as production problems in South America may reduce the estimated soybean ending stocks number. Our final April Better Farming segment looks at what Indiana farmers can do to make growing soybeans a more profitable crop.The video reports that aired in March and April focused on what growers can do to increase soybean production and profitability.  According to the research by Purdue’s Shawn Casteel, lowering plant population and planting earlier can significantly increase production while lowering costs. Economist Jim Mintert, with the Purdue Center for Commercial Agriculture, says what is needed is for growers to think about soybean production the way they think about corn production, “By that I mean better and more deliberate management. It is about seeding rate, using a planter rather than a drill, calibrating your planter correctly, assessing your field conditions; that is how we can lower our per bushel cost of producing soybeans.”Mintert says soybean yields have been steadily increasing and, with better management soybean production in Indiana, can continue to grow, “We have a lot more technology imbedded in those seeds today vs.2002. Our challenge is to find ways to reduce our cost per unit of output.”  Both Mintert and Casteel believe that better management is the key to reducing production costs while increasing soybean yields.In the May Better Farming reports, HAT will focus on what producers can do to maximize corn and soybean yields after the crop emerges.  Weed control is a major cost of production, and the failure to control weeks can reduce yields by as much as 30%.  In the May programs, the focus will be on how producers can control weeds and control costs.Be watching for our next Better Farming video report online at Hoosier Ag Today.com. The Better Farming reports are sponsored by the Indiana Soybean Checkoff and produced in cooperation with the Purdue Center for Commercial Agriculture. Making Soybeans More Profitablelast_img read more

Mexico Eager to Start and Finish NAFTA Negotiations

first_img Facebook Twitter SHARE Previous articleRyan Martin’s Indiana Ag Forecast for April 10, 2017Next articleWashington Earns a C for first quarter of 2017 Hoosier Ag Today Mexico is taking a “sooner rather than later” approach when it comes to potential changes to the North American Free Trade Agreement. A top Mexican official said last week, “It will be in the best advantage of the countries involved that we finish this negotiation within the context of this year.” That is because Mexico will hold a presidential election in July of next year and the current president has reached term limits, meaning there is no guarantee the next administration will come to the negotiating table. Mexico’s top trade official argued it will be challenging to ratify a deal by mid-2018, but he would like to wrap up negations by the end of this year.The U.S. is already undergoing the administrative steps to start negotiations. The earliest that talks can take place would be the end of July. Mexico and the U.S. remain at odds of the details of the negotiations, and Mexico’s trade negotiator warns the threat of tariffs from the U.S. risked opening a “Pandora’s box.” He argues that lobbyists in Mexico would urge him to strike back against major U.S. exports to Mexico like apples and corn.Source: NAFB News Service Mexico Eager to Start and Finish NAFTA Negotiations By Hoosier Ag Today – Apr 9, 2017 SHARE Home Indiana Agriculture News Mexico Eager to Start and Finish NAFTA Negotiations Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

Administration Focusing on Good, Not Quick, NAFTA 2.0

first_img SHARE Administration Focusing on Good, Not Quick, NAFTA 2.0 Home Indiana Agriculture News Administration Focusing on Good, Not Quick, NAFTA 2.0 Facebook Twitter SHARE Bloomberg says the U.S., Canada, and Mexico are all on separate pages when it comes to a new North American Free Trade Agreement. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin says the administration is more focused on reaching a good deal rather than an immediate one. Mnuchin says it doesn’t matter if it’s passed in this session of Congress or the next one. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said last week that there was a good NAFTA deal already on the table. However, U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer said just hours later that the “governments were nowhere close to a deal.”Mnuchin’s comments are the latest to suggest that the door may be open to finishing the NAFTA negotiations sometime after the Mexican presidential election on July first. However, he did raise the prospect of the president having multiple options on the table. “I’m not saying he’s willing to let it spill over,” Mnuchin says, “but he has all his alternatives. I’m just saying that, right now, we’re focused on negotiating a good deal and not focused on deadlines.” Mexico’s chief negotiator says the three countries have agreed on nine of about 30 chapters in the agreement. By Hoosier Ag Today – May 22, 2018 Facebook Twitter Previous articleHouse Farm Bill Dormant Amid Immigration DisputeNext articleEmergence Issues Plague East Central Indiana Crops Hoosier Ag Todaylast_img read more

Commentary: Finding Healing and Hope

first_img Facebook Twitter Previous articleTrump Touts “Progress” on Biofuels DealNext articleChina Lifts Punitive Tariffs on Pork, Soybeans Gary Truitt SHARE Home Commentary Commentary: Finding Healing and Hope Facebook Twitter By Gary Truitt – Sep 15, 2019 Commentary: Finding Healing and Hope By Gary TruittIt was one of the most amazing things I have ever seen. In front of an audience of over 100 people, a group of three farmers was openly discussing their journeys to bankruptcy and the loss of their operations. The presentation was unscripted and emotional. It was candid and from the heart. No one in the room was unmoved, and many were moved to tears. Sponsored by the Indiana AgriInstitute, the Healing the Heartland Symposium was designed to explore the causes of and solutions for stress and suicide among farmers.This year represents the 5th year of a recession in the U.S. farm economy. If this were the case in the general economy, it would be front-page news and would be a major political issue. As it is, the current situation in agriculture has not garnered much attention in the general media or general public. It has, however, had a major impact on the attitudes and outlooks of farmers.The Purdue/CME monthly barometer continues to show an increase in the anger level of producers and a decline in their optimism for the future. Comments at farm shows and field days this summer have been ugly and sarcastic. Farm bankruptcy numbers are up; and depression and suicides are being reported in farm country. Statistics indicate that the suicide rate among farmers in 60% higher than the general population.Dr. Michael Rosmann, a farmer and a psychologist at the University of Iowa, told the gathering there is an identifiable attribute that all farmers have that make them especially susceptible to depression and stress. The “agrarian imperative” is the clinical name for that which makes a farmer want to farm. Rosmann said they can measure physical, behavioral, and psychological change in a person based on crop conditions and animal health. So, it is not surprising that given the current state of crops, poor grain and milk prices, and animal disease concerns that most in agriculture are not in a good mood these days.Dr. Rosmann says we as humans can deal with two major stressors at a time but when you add in a third, we start to lose it.  For the past 5 years, producers have been dealing with increasing levels of financial stress, as well as crop and livestock stress. In 2018, the third stressor hit: uncertainty. The trade disputes and market reaction have produced tremendous uncertainty in agriculture. In 2019, we added the uncertainty of the planting season and, now, the uncertainty of harvest.The most effective program for dealing with farm stress, according to Dr. Rosmann, can be found in the tight-knit, religious communities of the Amish and Mennonites. Here the entire community comes together to support one other.  Contrast this with rural ag areas where individualism is prized and most farmers see their neighbors as competitors. The farmers on the panel described how they felt alone, isolated, and like they were the only ones going through this.I am sure one of the reasons these farmers were willing to share their stories was so others might be helped. The causes of the current downturn in the ag economy are largely out of the hands of farmers. One of the best things we can do is to come together, support each other, and help everyone make  it through. The greatest threat to a farming operation is hopelessness. In their presentations, all three of the producers stated it was only when they saw hope that they had the courage and strength to make the hard choices. SHARElast_img read more

Ag Secretaries Unite to Urge Ratification of USMCA

first_img Facebook Twitter Ag-secretaries-together-on-USMCASecretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue and former U.S. Secretaries of Agriculture Tom Vilsack, Dan Glickman, and John Block-USDA photo by Tom WithamAll of the living U.S. Secretaries of Agriculture agree. They want the U.S. Congress to ratify the U.S. Mexico Canada Trade Agreement, and they have all signed a letter to leaders in Congress expressing their support for USMCA.Three former secretaries were with current secretary Sonny Perdue at USDA Thursday to voice their support. Dan Glickman and John Block accompanied immediate past secretary in the Obama administration, Tom Vilsack, who asked two questions.“One is, is this enforceable, and I think there is a good faith effort being done by the Administration and Congress to make sure and reassure people that this is an enforceable agreement,” Vilsack said. “Secondly, is this a better deal than the current deal? I think under any evaluation, from the U.S. agriculture perspective it is clearly is a better deal. So, with that our hope is that it gets done, and gets done soon.”John Block served under Ronald Reagan and noted the bipartisan push.“The Secretaries of Agriculture, both parties, are standing shoulder to shoulder saying to the Congress, go ahead and pass this legislation, because that’s the first step,” he said. “Get that done, and then maybe we’ll have some momentum to move forward on this trade agreement with Japan. Maybe, I can hope and wish, maybe momentum to move ahead with China and start rapping out these deals.”Dan Glickman served in the Clinton White House. He said the absence of certain trade deals is fueling uncertainty in rural America.“That uncertainty would be much worse if we didn’t get a trade agreement with our partners, our neighbors, Mexico and Canada,” Glickman said. “Afterall, if we can’t work out with them then we can’t work out with anybody, and then farmers really face very serious problems and anxieties in terms of trying to sell their products to the world.”Secretary Block had a typical John Block final thought, straight to the point.“My final word is get it passed!” he said.Other secretaries signing the letter are Mike Espy (Clinton), Ann Veneman (W. Bush), Mike Johanns (W. Bush), and Ed Shafer (W. Bush), saying, “We need a strong and reliable trade deal with our top two customers for U.S. agriculture products. USMCA will provide certainty in the North American market for the U.S. farm sector and rural economy. We strongly support ratification of USMCA.” The full letter is here.Current Secretary Perdue added, “Support for USMCA crosses all political parties, specifically when it comes to the agriculture community, and I am proud to stand side by side with former agriculture secretaries who agree USMCA is good news for American farmers. I commend President Trump and Ambassador Lighthizer, for their perseverance, leadership, and hard work to get USMCA across the finish line.” By Andy Eubank – Sep 19, 2019 Home Indiana Agriculture News Ag Secretaries Unite to Urge Ratification of USMCA Facebook Twitter SHARE Ag Secretaries Unite to Urge Ratification of USMCA SHARE Previous articleVolatile Crude Oil Market Impacting Ag Commodity Prices and Best Manure Pit Safety on the HAT Thursday Morning EditionNext articleRyan Martin’s Indiana Farm Forecast for September 20, 2019 Andy Eubanklast_img read more

Justice Antonin Scalia, outspoken conservative intellectual, dies at 79

first_imgAssociate Justice Antonin Scalia during the group portrait of the U.S. Supreme Court at the Supreme Court Building in Washington, Friday, Oct. 8, 2010. Welcome TCU Class of 2025 ReddIt PolitiFrog: Survivor Tuesday roundup World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution Facebook Richard Escobedohttps://www.tcu360.com/author/richard-escobedo/ + posts Facebook Richard Escobedohttps://www.tcu360.com/author/richard-escobedo/ Richard Escobedo Richard Escobedohttps://www.tcu360.com/author/richard-escobedo/ Linkedincenter_img ReddIt TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history printSupreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, an outspoken conservative known for his missionary zeal and keen intellect, was remembered Saturday as an “extraordinary individual and jurist.”“His passing is a great loss to the court and the country he so loyally served,” Chief Justice John Roberts said in a statement. “We extend our deepest condolences to his wife, Maureen, and his family.”Justice Scalia, 79, was found dead Saturday morning at Cibolo Creek Ranch near Marfa, the U.S. Marshals Service in Washington confirmed. Spokeswoman Donna Sellers said Scalia retired Friday evening. He was found dead in his room by resort staff after he did not appear for breakfast.After his appointment in 1986 by President Ronald Reagan, Justice Scalia worked to pull the court closer to the right. He voted consistently to let states outlaw abortions, allow a closer relationship between government and religion, permit executions and limit lawsuits.He was also a champion of originalism, the method of constitutional interpretation that looks to the meaning of words and concepts as they were understood by the Founding Fathers.Antonin Gregory Scalia was born in Trenton, New Jersey on March 11, 1936, the only child of Salvatore Eugene Scalia and Catherine Panaro Scalia.In 1957, Scalia graduated valedictorian from Georgetown University with a Bachelor of Arts in history. In 1960, Scalia graduated magna cum laude from Harvard Law.[<a href=”//storify.com/tcu360/justice-scalia-died-at-79″ target=”_blank”>View the story “Justice Scalia Died at 79” on Storify</a>] Richard Escobedohttps://www.tcu360.com/author/richard-escobedo/ PolitiFrog: Trump, Rubio and Carson Will Cruise Through DFW Ahead of Super Tuesday Linkedin Trump, Rubio and Carson will cruise through DFW ahead of Super Tuesday Previous articleQ&A: Three professors received the Deans’ Research and Creativity AwardNext articleOld Frogs beat Varsity in baseball Alumni game Richard Escobedo RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter Harry Vincent says TCU lifts suspension for social media posts Twitterlast_img read more

Students with learning disabilities feel well accommodated at TCU

first_imgLinkedin Welcome TCU Class of 2025 Monica is a senior journalism major and political science minor and film double minor from Houston, TX. Students who have learning disabilities and receive accommodations at TCU may also take advantage of such resources in the workforce as well.Ramsey said it’s important that once a student who has a learning disability enters the workforce, he or she learns how to self-accommodate.“If your boss comes to you and gives you a deadline, you don’t get to go to your boss and say, ‘You gave me a week to do this, I’m going to need a week and a half,’” Ramsey said. “The individual has to figure out how they’re going to meet their deadline, whether that means working later hours, working longer or breaking the item down into little pieces.”She also said that with the advent of technology, there are a lot of things that can help individuals with disabilities, especially learning disabilities, to be successful.“If a student needs a note-taker, your employer is not going to provide that for you, so you may have to do things like record on a laptop,” Ramsey said. “It’s nice to have the technology that we have now.”Some TCU students who have learning disabilities also said that they’re not worried about the possibility of not receiving the same accommodations in the workforce that they’re used to receiving at TCU.“ADHD only affects me when I am being tested on subjects I do not enjoy,” senior engineering major Diego Padilla said. “I know that in the real world I will be doing what I am passionate about, so it does not worry me at all.”“Personally with myself, things that I enjoy are things that I know and understand more,” Arnold said. “Things I hope to do in the workforce are not things that my learning disability will necessarily play a part in.“With my ADHD and distraction, and my dyslexia and reading things, I don’t think those things will necessarily play as big a role in my life when I get out of college because it’ll be more things that I’m wanting to be doing,” Arnold added. “So I don’t know if accommodations in the workforce will necessarily be needed, personally for me.”How does TCU compare?Ramsey said that while it’s pretty consistent across universities for what each is currently doing to accommodate students with learning disabilities, there are some schools that have a for-pay program where students with learning disabilities may receive tutoring, mentors and special study spaces.“I don’t think that’s a place we’d ever go because we don’t want to nickel-and-dime students to death,” she said.TCU also has the Koehler Center for Teaching Excellence on campus, which works with faculty in order to teach them how to teach effectively, which certainly benefits students with learning disabilities.“The more ways you can present the information the better; when you bring in information using several modalities, you’re using more of your brain, so good teaching strategies in general benefit all students,” Ramsey said.Ramsey said that when TCU Student Disabilities Services works really well, “students come here, they get the access that they need and they graduate.”The Koehler Center, which is designed to work with faculty on teaching strategies and success for students in the classroom, is located in the Sid Richardson Building, Suite 501. | Photo from TCU Maps.The end year of World War I was incorrect in earlier versions of this post.  TAGSembedded documentimagephotos TCU complies with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, which prohibits discrimination in education against individuals with disabilities.Attaining success at TCU — and academic life in general — may have been tougher for students with learning disabilities prior to the department’s existence.“A lot of the time, learning disabilities were missed. Students just thought they weren’t smart and didn’t realize they had a learning disability,” Ramsey said.“It might also have been that students with a learning disability at that time didn’t wind up going to college because their kindergarten through 12th grade material was so difficult, and if they didn’t know what was wrong, they might just think ‘I’m not college material,’ and decide to go another route,” she added.It also may have taken students with learning disabilities longer to graduate, longer to study and/or the need of extra tutors and support all over campus for whatever class they were struggling in, said LaShondra Jimerson, a disabilities specialist in TCU’s Student Disabilities Services department.Former Director of TCU’s Bachelor of Social Work Program, Dr. Linda Moore, who retired in May, said that prior to the implementation of services and accommodations for students with learning disabilities across universities in the U.S., students with learning disabilities would either not succeed in college or not go to college at all.“Before the Education for Handicapped Children Act in the 1970s, many times kids with any kind of disability wouldn’t go to school at all,” Moore said. “When I was growing up, we didn’t have kids in wheelchairs in schools; we didn’t have kids with developmental delay or lots of disabilities in schools.”Moore also said she believes more students with learning disabilities are in college now because they’re more capable of handling it.“I’ve worked with students that have had learning disabilities 30 years ago who hadn’t been diagnosed and actually had some students that had never been tested that were reading on a third and fourth grade level —not because they couldn’t read, but because they had a disability, and because they had never been tested, they were basically almost failing out,” Moore said. “It’s very different today — students come in with their accommodations in hand.”The first testing for learning disabilities was in the late 1890s, then testing was done after the first World War I soldiers returned from war in the early 1900s finding they could no longer function using the same academic skills they used prior to the war, Student Disabilities Services Coordinator Laurel Overby said.An increase in students with learning disabilities attending school and pursuing higher-level education came out of the Civil Rights movement during the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s.Various groups were fighting for rights — the women’s rights movement, the African-American civil rights movement, the gay rights movement, the American Indian movement — and one of the major groups taking a stand for rights and equality at the time were people with disabilities, particularly parents of children with disabilities.“When parents want something for their kids, they tend to have a lot of power,” Moore said. “So once it got started, you saw people jumping on the bandwagon and the country got lots of legislation — we got the Education for Handicapped Children Act, we got the Architectural Barriers Act, and by 1990, we got the ADA, which is the most comprehensive piece of legislation ever for people with disabilities.”Overby said not much attention was given to disabilities until the 1980s and 1990s, with dyslexia being at the top of the list.“Disability falls under civil rights,” Overby said. “It was finally given a voice.”Student success Some TCU students with learning disabilities say that the assistance from the Student Disabilities Department has helped them greatly.Dorr, a strategic communication major, stressed the importance of his accommodations.“If I didn’t have my extended [test] time, I’d probably fail out of TCU,” he said. “And if I wasn’t able to type my notes, I don’t know how I’d be able to take notes on paper without getting distracted.”He also said he feels like he wouldn’t be as successful at TCU without the existence of the Student Disabilities Services department.“I think for only one or two of my classes I haven’t needed to use extended time on exams, and that’s just one to two classes. This is my first semester of my junior year, so I’ve used a lot of my extended time,” Dorr said.Regan Arnold, a junior entrepreneurial management major, was diagnosed with dyslexia and ADHD in fourth grade. She says a large reason she chose to attend TCU is because of the university’s accommodations for students with learning disabilities.“I have worked really hard to overcome my learning disability, so I think that I can be successful on my own, but the fact that they have the resources here really played a part in why I came here,” Arnold said.However, only 17 percent of college students with learning disabilities take advantage of “learning resources at their school.” Trey Fearn is a first-year Film, Television and Digital Media major who says he has a fine motor skills deficiency as a result from concussions during high school. He said he has difficulty processing information and takes longer time to read.“If you give me a Scantron, I can have the answer in my head, but the actual act of bubbling it would take me a while,” Fearn said.He said he has not yet utilized the Student Disabilities Services to acquire assistance for his learning disability, nor has he told any of his professors of it.“So far, I’ve been doing just fine without it, but I will 100 percent start using the accommodations throughout college,” Fearn said.According to a study done by the National Center for Learning Disabilities, the three factors most attributed to success post-high school for students with learning disabilities are a supportive home life, a strong sense of self-confidence and a strong connection to friends and family. + posts Bluebonnet Circle workout studio owner stresses importance of community Unpaid internships: history, insight and TCU students’ stories Facebook ReddIt Monica Dziakhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/monica-dziak/ Test anxiety, pressure on college students more common now than in past Monica Dziakhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/monica-dziak/ World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution center_img Monica Dziak Monica Dziakhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/monica-dziak/ Linkedin Previous articlePaschal High School teacher wins excellence awardNext articleTCU considering on-campus centralized testing center Monica Dziak RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter According to a study done by the National Center for Learning Disabilities, if a student with a learning disability has a supportive home life, strong self-confidence and a strong connection to loved ones, they are more likely to be successful after high school. | Photo from the National Center for Learning Disabilities.Other factors associated with success for students with learning disabilities include: early support for learning and attention issues, planning a smooth transition from high school to college or other post-high school endeavors, supportive teachers, facilitating relationships with mentors and participating in extracurricular activities.Junior child development major Antoinette Shrewsbury said that support from others has helped for her to cope with ADD, dysgraphia, fine motor skill issues and an auditory processing disorder.“For years, I always felt embarrassed about the many learning disabilities I’ve had to deal with,” Shrewsbury said. “But now, thanks to my parents, teachers and academic counselors, I couldn’t be prouder of my academic achievements and success in school.“My parents never allowed me to use my impairments as a crutch to feel sorry for myself, which used to drive me up a wall,” she added. “But now, I can’t thank them enough for never allowing me to give up on myself and for pushing me to be the best student I can be.”But what happens to a student in the “real world” who has a learning disability? The accommodations may look different than what the students are used to during college, but there are still accommodations.Looking forward  The Learning Disabilities Association of America, in compliance with both the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the 1990 ADA, states that employers covered by either law “make reasonable accommodations for qualified individuals with impairments that substantially limit a major life activity, such as learning.”It also states that achieving success in the workplace is a two-way street, and that both individuals with learning disabilities and employers should “work together for their mutual benefit.” ReddIt printWhile some college students enjoy sitting at the back of their classrooms, junior Chris Dorr sits at the very front. Dorr receives preferential seating in order to accommodate his learning disabilities, attention deficit disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.“During quizzes and other assignments, if I see people it kind of makes me anxious, like ‘Oh, they’re finished, why am I not finished?’” he said.Dorr is one of 404 TCU students currently receiving an accommodation for a learning disability.According to the 1990 Americans With Disabilites Act, a learning disability is a “neurologic disorder that causes difficulties in learning that cannot be attributed to poor intelligence, poor motivation or inadequate teaching.”Common learning disabilities include dyslexia, dyscalculia, dysgraphia, auditory processing deficit, visual processing deficit and ADD/ADHD.According to the National Center for Education Statistics, of college undergraduates who self-reported having a disability, 11 percent reported having a learning disability. Also, more than 200,000 students who enter college have some kind of learning disability.TCU Student Disabilities Services provides various accommodations for students with learning disabilities — which range from extended time on tests to recorded class lectures — based upon approved documentation verifying “the existence of a disability.”Marsha Ramsey, director of Center for Academic Services, said specialists in the Student Disabilities Services department look for functional limitations when evaluating students’ documentation.“This is about access,” Ramsey said. “If there are barriers, then we’re trying to determine how to remove those barriers so students can demonstrate what it is they know or what they learn.”Looking back Student Disabilities Services was not present at TCU until 1993, with the passage of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Section 504 of the legislation prohibits discrimination against individuals with disabilities. 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