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Crude bomb destroys the car of the editor of Primera Hora in Nuevo Laredo

first_img Reporter murdered in northwestern Mexico’s Sonora state Organisation RSF_en MexicoAmericas Reporters Without Borders called on the authorities to do their utmost to shed light on a bomb attack that destroyed the car of the editor of Primera Hora in Nuevo Laredo in the north-east on 10 May, the second attack on a journalist in the same city since the beginning of the year. April 28, 2021 Find out more MexicoAmericas Help by sharing this information Follow the news on Mexico Receive email alerts News May 5, 2021 Find out more May 13, 2021 Find out more News Reports 2011-2020: A study of journalist murders in Latin America confirms the importance of strengthening protection policies Reporters Without Borders said it was appalled at a bid to intimidate newspaper editor Pedro Pérez Natividad of the daily Primera Hora whose vehicle was wrecked by a crude bomb in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas State in the north-east on 10 May.The bombing was the second attack against a journalist in the same city since the start of the year. Dolores Guadalupe García Escamilla, of Estéreo 91 XHNOE radio, died from her injuries on 16 April after a being shot 11 days earlier.”The climate of terror and impunity for which journalists pay the price in Mexico’s northern states is reaching alarming and unacceptable proportions”, said Reporters Without Borders.”Once again we call for a serious investigation to unmask not only the killers but those who order these repeated bombings against the press. We also hope that the special prosecutor’s office, set up at a federal level, will support the judicial process”, the worldwide press freedom organisation said.Natividad’s van was parked in front of his home a few streets from the newspaper’s offices when the interior was completely wrecked by a crude bomb. Police found a Coca-Cola bottle and a petrol-soaked cloth inside the vehicle. “I have no enemies or fight with anyone. I am afraid because I don’t know where the threat could come from”, the editor told Reporters Without Borders. Natividad also said he had not received any warning, although a colleague specialised in criminal cases had been sent threats that were intercepted by the police. Dolores Guadalupe García Escamilla had also been threatened before being attacked.An article in Primera Hora about drug-traffickers might have been behind the attack on Natividad but he pointed out, “This case goes back eight months and it was reported on by all the media, based on information provided by the authorities.”Witnesses said they saw a man of around 1.70m in height wearing a striped shirt fleeing the scene after the explosion. The Primera Hora editor has been receiving Tamaulipas state police protection since 12 May. NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say May 13, 2005 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Crude bomb destroys the car of the editor of Primera Hora in Nuevo Laredo to go further Newslast_img read more

The Landsat Image Mosaic of Antarctica

first_imgThe Landsat Image Mosaic of Antarctica (LIMA) is the first true-color, high-spatial-resolution image of the seventh continent. It is constructed from nearly 1100 individually selected Landsat-7 ETM+ scenes. Each image was orthorectified and adjusted for geometric, sensor and illumination variations to a standardized, almost seamless surface reflectance product. Mosaicing to avoid clouds produced a high quality, nearly cloud-free benchmark data set of Antarctica for the International Polar Year from images collected primarily during 1999-2003. Multiple color composites and enhancements were generated to illustrate additional characteristics of the multispectral data including: the true appearance of the surface: discrimination between snow and bare ice; reflectance variations within bright snow; recovered reflectance values in regions of sensor saturation; and subtle topographic variations associated with ice flow. LIMA is viewable and individual scenes or user defined portions of the mosaic are downloadable at http://Iima.usgs.gov. Educational materials associated with LIMA are available at http://Iima.nasa.gov.last_img read more

Jerry O’Connell Joins Living on Love on Broadway

first_img Star Files Jerry O’Connell will return to Broadway in the upcoming production of Joe DiPietro’s Living on Love. He completes a cast that includes the previously announced Renée Fleming, Douglas Sills and Anna Chlumsky. Performances of the comedy, directed by Kathleen Marshall, will begin on April 1 at the Longacre Theatre.O’Connell will take on the role of Robert Samson, the part Justin Long played in the Williamstown Theatre Festival production last summer. O’Connell returns to the Great White Way after making his debut in the 2011 production of Seminar. His many onscreen credits include Stand by Me, Jerry Maguire, Sliders and Crossing Jordan. He most recently appeared on the New York stage last spring in American Hero off-Broadway.Based on the play Peccadillo by Garson Kanin, Living on Love follows Raquel DeAngelis (Fleming), a celebrated opera diva who, after her husband—the egomaniacal Maesto Vito DeAngelis (Sills)—becomes enamored with his autobiography’s ghost writer (Chlumsky), decides to hire her very own (and handsome) ghostwriter (O’Connell). Sparks fly, silverware is thrown, and romance blossoms.In addition to O’Connell, Fleming, Sills and Chlumsky, the company will include Blake Hammond and Scott Robertson. Opening night is set for April 20. Living on Love Show Closed This production ended its run on May 3, 2015 Related Shows View Comments Jerry O’Connelllast_img read more

‘Trashy Farming.’

first_imgMax Carter’s Coffee County farm doesn’t impress you with its neatness. “I like myfarming on the trashy side,” Carter chuckled as he checked his cotton and peanutfields.The beauty of Carter’s farm, though, is beginning to catch the eye of more than onebeholder. The scruffy look of crops planted into the stubble of previous crops hides asimple success a growing number of farmers are embracing.”It’s hard to say for sure how many farmers are using conservation tillage,”said Glen Harris, an Extension Service crop and soil scientist with the University ofGeorgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.”We’ve been saying 15 percent of row crops,” Harris said. “Last year,though, I really think it might have been as high as 20 percent or even 25 percent.” Other than Carter, only the insects work his fields. “After I got into no-till,all my help wanted to work at Wal-mart or uptown, so I started doing it all myself,”he said. “And I take a swing at a golf ball once in a while.”Carter won’t say he’s making big money. “We’re saving money, naturally, from lessplowing and less chemicals,” he said. “If we’re going out of business, we’re atleast going out slower.”Improved Soil QualityHe and Harris agree that conservation tillage’s single greatest benefit is improvedsoil quality.”Everything goes back to building the organic matter in the soil,” Harrissaid. “That’s a real challenge, especially in our sandy south Georgia soils. It’s nota one-year thing. But a farmer should see a real difference in three to five years.”Carter figures the new millennium will see more of this low-input farming.”Conservation-tillage people will be the ones to bring the flag out when it’s allover,” he said.”They can stay longer than a person who’s wearing out tractors and letting histopsoil leave while he’s sleeping,” he said. “If you don’t have a healthytopsoil, you’ll lose somewhere — now or the next generation.” Photo: Glen Harris Photo: Glen Harris This story is another in a weekly series called “Planting the Seed: Science for the New Millennium.” These stories feature ideas and advances in agricultural and environmental sciences with implications for the future.center_img In conservation tillage, farmers use special equipment to loosen the soil in narrow grooves or strips soil and plant rows of summer crops into the stubble of previous winter grain crops like this field of rye. It may not be the prettiest farming, but these cotton rows emerging from the stubble of a winter rye crop are economically attractive to a growing number of farmers. Planting in StripsTraditionally, farmers make as many as five passes over their land in the process oftilling their soil and planting their crops.Carter and others who use conservation tillage don’t do all that plowing. They usestrip tillage equipment to plant rows of summer crops into the stubble of small-grainwinter crops.”It saves a lot of time and money,” Harris said. “It has a lot of otherbenefits, too. It greatly improves the soil’s water-holding and nutrient-holding capacity.For years, we promoted it as a means to control soil erosion. But now, the economics aremaking it catch on.”Carter said he started his “ugly farming” on a small scale. “I startedplaying with this with soybeans behind wheat 24 years ago,” he said. “I’ve beenfarming since 1954. I call myself doing it wrong for 20 years. We plowed these fields atremendous amount. We built ponds and pumped water.Less Plowing, Watering”And finally, after 20 years,” he said, “we realized we weren’t gettinga lot accomplished. Over the past 24 years, we’ve grown into a no-till situation.”Now, Carter has crops growing on his 200 acres virtually year-round. He usually makesnearly two bales of cotton per acre and has equally impressive peanut yields. But hespends far less money and effort to produce his crops.”We don’t irrigate anymore since we quit plowing,” he said. “We sold offthe irrigation equipment. We maintain enough straw on the land to give us a kind of mulchto preserve the water that falls.”Less Labor, TooNear the end of the season, Carter still hadn’t put any insecticide on his cotton orpeanuts. “We attribute that to beneficial insects,” he said. “They come inand work the fields.”last_img read more