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Low dose CT lung cancer screenings available for smokers

first_img Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Jane Bozelka UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Previous articleNovember Supermoon a Spectacular SightNext articleNew WWII Movie Tells True Story of the First Conscientious Objector to Receive Medal of Honor Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR  If you’re a smoker (or ex-smoker) between the ages of 55 to 79 who has smoked at least 1 pack per day within the last 30 years or at least 2 packs per day for 15 years (also referred to as pack years), you may be at high risk and should consider a screening.Florida Hospital offers a low dose CT cancer screening to accurately detect signs of lung cancer. Medical studies have shown cure rates significantly improve when the disease is detected and treated at the earliest stages.A low dose CT screening takes minutes and is a noninvasive, painless procedure that uses low dose X-rays to screen your lungs for cancerous lesions. These screenings are offered at Florida Hospital and Florida Radiology Imaging locations throughout Central Florida.A lung cancer care coordinator is available to assist participants every step of the way, especially to make sure you meet the criteria for screening.Lung cancer screenings are recommended annually for current and former smokers by the United States Preventive Services Task Force, American College of Chest Physicians and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.According to the National Institutes of Health, about 224,000 Americans will be diagnosed with lung cancer this year, and it’s the leading cause of cancer deaths for American men and women. An estimated 158,000 lung cancer deaths nationwide will occur this year. This number has declined in recent years, partly because of better detection and fewer people smoking. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Please enter your comment!  Jane Bozelka, smoked for 40 years until a lung cancer screening revealed Stage III-a lung cancer. Fortunately, Jane underwent a robotic lobectomy and is doing well. She believes the screening saved her life. Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Please enter your name here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom last_img read more

3×3 Family Houses / Endorfine Office

first_imgManufacturers: FAKRO, Reynaers Aluminium, Baumit, Princ parketSave this picture!© Studio FlusserRecommended ProductsWoodLunawoodThermo Timber and Industrial ThermowoodWindowspanoramah!®ah!38 – FlexibilityMetallicsKriskadecorMetal Fabric – Outdoor CladdingWoodHESS TIMBERTimber – GLT HybridSave this picture!Site PlanText description provided by the architects. The reason for building two houses was an idea to create minimal ergonomic accommodation which combines functionality and design. All of this set into the golf resort with access to the water.Save this picture!© Studio FlusserSave this picture!Floor Plans – House AThe form of both buildings was made by adding basic elements – living blocks. The blocks are arranged once horizontally and then vertically. Each house consists of three such elements.Save this picture!© Studio FlusserSave this picture!Floor Plan – House BThis way the buildings serve different qualities of inside living space and at the same time different aspects of an extrovert and introvert relationship with the surrounding. Each house has one open space of day living area and two rooms with its facilities.Save this picture!© Studio FlusserProject gallerySee allShow lessWhat Makes The Barbican The Perfect Setting for Music Videos?VideosThe Maersk Tower / C.F. Møller ArchitectsSelected Projects Share CopyHouses•Hrubá Borša, Slovakia Houses Projects Architects: Endorfine Office Area Area of this architecture project ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/887398/3×3-family-houses-endorfine-office Clipboard 2017 Slovakia Save this picture!© Studio Flusser+ 36Curated by Fernanda Castro Share CopyAbout this officeEndorfine OfficeOfficeFollowProductsWoodConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesHrubá BoršaSlovakiaPublished on January 22, 2018Cite: “3×3 Family Houses / Endorfine Office” 22 Jan 2018. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogAluminium CompositesTechnowoodHow to Design a Façade with AluProfile Vertical ProfilesSynthetics / AsphaltMitrexSolar RoofMetal PanelsAurubisCopper Alloy: Nordic RoyalPlumbingSanifloGreywater Pump – Sanifast®SWH190WoodLunawoodInterior ThermowoodMembranesEffisusAVCL Systems for FacadesSinksCosentinoBathroom Collection – Silestone® WashbasinsDoorsStudcoPocket Door Trims – CavKitWoodStructureCraftEngineering – Architectural & FreeformMetal PanelsRHEINZINKPanel Surface Finish – prePATINA-LineHanging LampsEureka LightingSuspended Lights – BloomMetallicsBaileyFacade Systems- I-Line Snap-On Feature ChannelMore products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream Area:  78 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project center_img ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/887398/3×3-family-houses-endorfine-office Clipboard “COPY” Photographs 3×3 Family Houses / Endorfine OfficeSave this projectSave3×3 Family Houses / Endorfine Office Photographs:  Studio Flusser Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project “COPY” 3×3 Family Houses / Endorfine Office Year:  ArchDailylast_img read more

The War on Public Lands

first_imgDan Ashe is at war. As Director of the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, he has been on the frontlines for control of America’s public lands. That battle reached a radical new tipping point earlier this year when a mob of armed militants seized the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in rural Oregon that falls under Ashe’s jurisdiction. Even as an inherent optimist, Ashe had difficulty suppressing his outrage over the occupation.“I was angry. I was angry because Ammon Bundy and his cohorts were walking around the community, going to the Safeway and buying supplies and going to church on Sunday, and I wanted them in jail,” Ashe said in July. “But I tip my hat to the FBI. Their whole strategy was to ignore them. They said, ‘They’re way out there at the refuge, and we know that means a lot to you, but they’re isolated and they can’t really do any damage. We’re just going to ignore them and all the press is going to go away and they’re going to get frustrated.’ And they were right.“It was tragic that LaVoy Finicum was killed, but when you think about the loss of life that could have occurred, it could have ended a lot worse.”On the grand scale, of course, nothing has ended. And Ashe recognizes that all too well. Many Republican lawmakers have joined the armed militants in calling for the transfer of public lands out of federal ownership.Beyond the cascade of death threats to Oregon State Troopers, FBI, and federal officials in retaliation to Finicum’s death (he was shot by State Police when he ran a road block), beyond the blow to employee morale that left half the Malheur NWF workforce desiring to leave, and beyond even William Keebler’s thwarted attempt to blow up a Bureau of Land Management facility near Finicum’s grazing allotment in northwest Arizona, this most explosive manifestation of the public lands takeover effort to date is just another in a series of historic attempts to wrestle away the wild, open spaces initially set aside for the benefit and use of all Americans.caricature_of_ammon_bundyAmmon Bundy led the controversial armed takeover of the Malheur Wildlife Refuge.“This is an ideology and they are waging a campaign. They know what they’re doing,” Ashe said. “It’s closely related to this effort to divest millions of acres from the federal estate. And it’s not about giving it to the states so the states can be better managers of a recreational resource. It’s about converting that land and that resource to capital, to profit. So the [outdoors and conservation] community needs to recognize that. We have to get smarter. We have to have a better strategy than they have. Because right now, they’re winning. They’re doing what the conservation community used to do well—they’re putting together a long ground game, and they are changing the minds of voters on this issue. We have to get back to those basics. We have to be better at it than they are.”It does remain rare to see the fight over America’s public lands played out so vividly on the ground. The political arena has historically served as the battleground for well-funded special interest groups orchestrating attempts to usurp millions of acres of primarily Western lands managed by the U.S. Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service,  and U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.Those politics have become increasingly evident as the push recently has made its way eastward, with nine state legislatures east of the Mississippi adopting language crafted by the shadowy American Legislative Exchange Council to pass, or attempt to pass, resolutions expressing support for the transfer of public lands out of federal ownership.On a national scale, groups like the American Lands Council, run by Utah state Rep. Ken Ivory and Montana state Sen. Jennifer Fielder, and the congressional Federal Land Action Group created by U.S. House Natural Resources Committee Chairman Rob Bishop and fellow Utah Rep. Chris Stewart, have been chipping away at more than a century of responsible American stewardship with a combination of legislation attempts and erosion of public support by confusing the issue for voters.Echoing the voices of militants in Oregon, Bishop says his group is working to “return these lands back to the rightful owners”—by taking them away from the American people.In July, the Republican National Committee upped the ante by approving a Party Platform that endorses the disposal of federal public lands, saying, “Congress shall immediately pass universal legislation providing for a timely and orderly mechanism requiring the federal government to convey certain federally controlled public lands to states. We call upon all national and state leaders and representatives to exert their utmost power and influence to urge the transfer of those lands.”If federal lands are transferred to states, they can more readily be sold or used by private and commercial interests.In addition to 10 states in the intermountain West and Alaska, anti-public land state legislators in Arkansas, Georgia, Missouri, New Hampshire, Ohio, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia have jumped on board by crafting resolutions supporting the idea that our public lands should be turned over to the states. The potential transfer of some of the East’s most popular national public lands—the Blue Ridge Parkway, Great Smoky Mountain National Park, the Appalachian National Scenic Trail—along with vulnerable U.S. wildlife refuges and treasured national forests is growing incrementally closer to reality.Nothing is outside the realm of this movement.Bills still lingering in the U.S. House of Representatives introduced by Republican congressmen from Idaho and Alaska attempt to carve off up to 4 million acres of national forest per state, granting “advisory councils” comprised of county officials and extraction industries control over how our now public lands are managed. Just last summer, Bishop and fellow Utah Rep. Jason Chaffetz also attempted to slip amendments into bills that would have defunded law enforcement programs of the U.S. Forest Service (and BLM) and disposed of the popular Vieques National Wildlife Refuge in Puerto Rico. The amendments were ultimately removed.The reality of the Republican platform, combined with the barrage of Republican-sponsored bills or amendments attempting to undercut protections for public lands in recent years, make it difficult not to frame this as a partisan issue. It isn’t, at least not uniformly. Despite the exclusive support of Republican lawmakers, voters from the party of Teddy Roosevelt have traditionally seen eye-to-eye with Democrats in their opposition to public land transfers. Public opinion nationwide has shown overwhelming support for conservation of national parks and public lands through the years, along with high opinions of federal land management agencies.Without a sustained counter-attack, however, folks like Ashe worry that the physical representation of 240 years of American democracy could disappear in a blink. And Republican land managers like Jim Caswell, Director of the BLM for 8 years under George W. Bush and a former National Forest supervisor in Idaho, agree.“I said, ‘It will never happen,’ for a long time, but now I’m not so sure,” Caswell said of the takeover attempts. “We’ve lost our public support. We’ve lost our constituency. People do not go to battle for us anymore.”More likely, that constituency has merely been misplaced as much of the voting public fails to recognize just what’s at stake. The 640 million acres of federally administered lands owned by the people, for the people, are managed for a variety of uses, ranging from livestock grazing and resource extraction to outdoor recreational opportunities like camping, hiking, biking, hunting, fishing, boating, skiing—even gatherings like the Burning Man festival.According to the Outdoor Industry Association, America’s public lands serve as the foundation of a $646 billion annual outdoor recreation economy, with 6.1 million Americans relying on the outdoor industry for employment. More than $80 million in annual tax revenue is spread among communities across the country, including about $1 million in northern Nevada during the weeklong Burning Man. The event’s economic ripple measured between $55-60 million in 2015.But rather than sustain the long-term economic benefits of federal lands, many state governments would rather sell national forests and parks through timber sales, mining, and outright transfer of public land to private and commerical interests. Idaho, for example, has sold off more than 1.7 million acres (41 percent) of the 4.2 million given to it by Congress at statehood. That’s an area roughly equal to the entire George Washington-Jefferson National Forest system liquidated to big corporations and other wealthy private interests.Economic analysis by multiple universities shows that the financial burden placed on states attempting to manage millions more acres of land transferred from federal agencies is likely to result in significant deficits, demanding more selloffs. Rest assured it won’t be a group of disgruntled cowboys buying up that property—or even Wilderness-restricted mountain bikers, for that matter. But like the rest of America, they’ve all got skin in the game.“If we lose our public lands heritage, we’ve lost a lot for a long, long time,” Caswell said. “We have to keep them public. They are worth fighting for.”last_img read more