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Evil in the making

first_imgWhat makes an armed man kill an unarmed civilian? What makes him join the killing of many hundreds — or hundreds of thousands — of civilians?University of Amsterdam Professor of Social Science Emeritus Abram de Swaan takes a hard look at the subject in his new book, “The Killing Compartments: The Mentality of Mass Murder.” History is appallingly dense with examples, from medieval warfare to Nazi Germany to Stalin’s purges to Rwanda in the 1990s.De Swaan talked with the Gazette ahead of a Tuesday lecture at the Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies.GAZETTE: You point out that genocide did not arise in the 20th century. Has it been with us always?DE SWAAN: I’m afraid so. I avoid the term “genocide” because it has a very precise but rather problematic legal definition. I use “mass violence” for very large-scale, asymmetric encounters between organized and armed men — it’s usually men — and organized and unarmed other people.In many times and places, a victorious army would routinely kill off whoever it could get ahold of, rape the women, enslave people, burn. Until, say, the 15th or 16th century, the chroniclers exaggerate the amount of bloodshed with glee and pride in what their army has accomplished and how much carnage was [done] in honor of the king or the great leader.What is modern about genocide or about mass violence is the embarrassment about it.GAZETTE: So it is not the practice that has changed, but our interpretation of it?DE SWAAN: You could say that the scale has increased, with the emergence of a state system in which states are an enormous accumulation of the means of violence, including huge nuclear stockpiles. Internally, there is a domestic pacification, relative peace within every state territory, and so the overall figures for homicide, etc., decline in the course of centuries. This has been known by people in the profession for quite some time, and [Steven] Pinker in “The Better Angels [of Our Nature]” has popularized that insight. On the other hand, violence between states becomes ever more lethal and destructive on an ever-larger scale, but it happens more rarely.Once war starts, victorious soldiers often regress into a state of triumphant rage and go on a rampage. The My Lai massacre [of the Vietnam War] is a classic example of what happens all the time in guerilla warfare, almost always in the colonial conquests of the Western powers. In a way My Lai was routine; what was new about My Lai was that the domestic audience found out. If this [kind of thing had] happened at the end of 19th century and a reporter had known about it, he probably would have shut up.GAZETTE: Are there mass killings — and I assume we’re leaving out war itself — going on now?DE SWAAN: I’m afraid so. Two examples that come to mind right away are Darfur, which has not stopped — very tragic and awful ― and the other, of course is ISIS.GAZETTE: You drill down into the motivations of the perpetrators and poke holes in the idea of the “banality of evil” and the thought that any one of us in a similar situation might behave that way. Can you talk a little about that?DE SWAAN: There is a rather surprising consensus in the entire literature on mass violence that ordinary people in what they call extraordinary — genocidal — situations commit extraordinary evil.The first thing is, yes, that’s true. The second thing is that some people are more likely to get into those situations than others. And the question is, what sort of people are more likely to? Obviously people who are professional experts on violence: police, military people, violent criminals.One could, with many caveats, say that certain characteristics are more likely to occur more frequently with genocidal perpetrators. For example, they have a working conscience, [but] restricted to family, their superiors, and their comrades-in-arms. Everyone else doesn’t count. Now, this is not that unusual a pattern of conscience formation, but usually education tries to inculcate a broader sense of identification with other human beings.They [also] show a remarkably low sense of agency. This just happened to them, they didn’t know, they didn’t particularly want to, but one thing led to another. That may be an artifact of the fact that most of what we know is from when they appear before judges, so they have an interest in not looking like someone who knowingly and willing committed these acts.GAZETTE: Is it hard to get at the truth of that part of the picture?DE SWAAN: Yes, because you must realize that we know very little about these people. First of all, if they’re victorious, they’ll be heroes. If their side is defeated, then maybe some of them will appear before the judges and we’ll find out about them. This was the case in Germany. It was the case in Serbia and Rwanda, but think of China, Indonesia, Pakistan, Russia. It boggles the mind that, of all of these hundreds of thousand of killers, no one ever appeared before a judge. I say it’s one of the safest professions on the planet: mass murder.The most striking thing is they seem to lack sympathy, compassion, pity. Sometimes it seems as if they don’t know what it is. There is a classic exchange in which the judge said, “Don’t you feel pity for all those you killed?” And the man said, “Oh yes, your honor, it was awful, I got all this blood and brains on my uniform. And the shouting and the shrieking of those women was impossible to bear.” The one he had pity for was the guy with the soiled uniform, which is just eerie if you think of it.GAZETTE: You also mention the personal preparation — the individual circumstances — that needs to happen. You talked a bit about what Germany and individual Germans went through.DE SWAAN: The general cultural or specific professional upbringing is enormously important. All Germans were exposed to 12 years of what may be the vilest lies and propaganda and vilification campaign in history. It was relentless; you could not hear alternative truth. And SS training [in particular] was specifically aimed at numbing any kind of compassion in almost perverse ways, sometimes so perverse that you don’t even want to talk about it.GAZETTE: What do we know about SS training?DE SWAAN: For example, they were made to shoot their own dogs. Dogs were highly valued, but you had to learn — a true SS man had to learn — to overcome their feelings if it was necessary for the Volk.GAZETTE: What do you think is most important for the public to understand about these issues?DE SWAAN: First, how often it occurs, how hard it is to realize that, yes, it really happened, and how difficult it is for any nation face its own crimes.The Dutch have genocide in their history — in Aceh [Indonesia] — and there’s only one book — by a nonprofessional historian — about it. That’s the Dutch past, more than a century ago, but it was pretty bloody, about 100,000 people. And the terrible history of the Belgians in the Congo is very difficult to face. And the same goes for America.GAZETTE: Clearly the treatment of Native Americans could qualify, but what’s your point of view on where America’s crimes of this nature have occurred?DE SWAAN: I’m afraid that the Vietnam War and the bombing of Cambodia were horrible. I do not mention air war [in the book] because of the distance between the perpetrators and victims, but also maybe out of a shared Western blind spot.Once the German air force was overcome, the Allied forces, the Western forces used the air war very intensely and sometimes very effectively and at relatively little cost. This has served the Western powers very well. And I am among those who have an underdeveloped moral capacity to judge that. So maybe somebody else should stand up and explain what the West has done.GAZETTE: Dresden and Hiroshima and Nagasaki?DE SWAAN: I feel very uneasy about it. Even at this very moment, we use bombing from the air. Those who are the object of that, for example ISIS, could say, “Look, they don’t even come out into the open, they’re manipulating their drones and bombing us and our families. Let them come out into a fair fight.”And then we take literally the moral high ground and criticize them for their barbarous methods. But there must be a discourse going on — on the other side — which is not entirely devoid of moral dimensions. It’s a pity we don’t talk to those guys and those guys don’t talk to us, except in the most horrible way. They have a point and it would be a conversation — and I’ve never had it, nor have you, nor almost any of us. It would be interesting to see how we would come out if it.GAZETTE: You stop beheading people and we’ll stop sending drones — that sort of conversation?DE SWAAN: That sort of deal, yes. But probably they can muster as much moral indignation about our bombings as we can about their beheadings. I’m not saying that the truth lies in the middle. I’m not saying that both parties are equally evil. I’m just saying you might be in for a surprise if you were in an open conversation with one of those people.GAZETTE: If you look at Nazi Germany, it almost sounds like an entire people were steeped in the propaganda. Is that situation, in a way, being recreated on the Internet, where people with a certain mindset can visit only areas where people who have the same point of view are, and create a similar echo-chamber effect?DE SWAAN: I don’t know, I don’t much look into those sites. But the amazing thing is that, globally, you can find people exactly like you all over the world and then shield yourself off from any other opinion. So you can be secluded, provincial, parochial, on a global scale.last_img read more

Financial inclusion as a driver of growth

first_img This post is currently collecting data… This is placeholder text continue reading » CUNA’s research shows that credit unions that are intentionally financially inclusive  grow memberships, loans, and assets faster, without harming portfolio quality. CUNA Vice President of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion was joined by other credit union leaders for a webinar Thursday on the business case for serving Latinx consumers.Latinx in the U.S. are the fastest growing racial or ethnic group, and half were unbanked or underbanked compared to one-third of whites in 2017.CUNA evaluated Coopera’s Hispanic Outreach Program, which provides demographic analytics, consulting services, and training to help credit unions with outreach and service to the Hispanic/Latinx market.center_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Amazon Announces Plans to Open New Delivery Station in Boca Raton

first_imgOnline retailer Amazon announced Wednesday that it plans to open a new delivery station in south Palm Beach County later this year.Amazon Logistics, the company’s delivery service, has signed “various leases” in an effort to open the delivery facility in Boca Raton.The new station will expedite deliveries for customers in the Boca Raton area, according to the company.Delivery stations allow “Amazon Logistics to supplement capacity and flexibility to Amazon’s delivery capabilities,” the company added in a written statement.Hundreds of full-time and part-time jobs, paying a minimum of $15 per hour with benefits, will be available.last_img read more

QPR v Doncaster line-ups: R’s handed major boost for Rovers clash

first_imgCharlie Austin returns to the QPR side to face Doncaster after missing two matches with a hamstring problem. Nedum Onuoha keeps his place, with Clint Hill on the bench. QPR: Green; Simpson, Onuoha, Dunne, Assou-Ekotto, Barton, Kranjcar, Hoilett, O’Neil, Benayoun, Austin.Subs: Murphy; Traore, Hill, Phillips, Johnson, Carroll, Henry.Doncaster: Turnbull, Quinn, Furman, Duffy, Macheda, Cotterill, McCullough, Wakefield, Wellens, Robinson, Stevens.Subs: Maxted; Brown, Woods, De Val Fernandez, Bennett, Forrester, Peterson.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Half-time: Fulham 1 Blackpool 2

first_imgFulham trail at the break to the Championship’s basement club but will be up against 10 men after Tony McMahon’s sending off.An error from Nikolay Bodurov allowed Ishmael Miller to net after just 90 seconds and the lively Blackpool forward set up debutant Jacob Murphy to double the visitors’ lead.In between the two goals, Bryan Ruiz guided a header just over the bar and Hugo Rodallega forced Blackpool keeper Joe Lewis into a good save.Fernando Amorebieta and Moussa Dembele, both back in the starting line-up, combined on 28 minutes but the striker put the Spanish defender’s cross into the side netting.With five minutes left to play in the first half, Blackpool had their captain dismissed when McMahon kicked out at Rodallega following a drop ball.Fulham replied before half-time when their skipper Scott Parker applied the finishing touch from Rodallega’s pass after Blackpool failed to clear a corner.Amorebieta, who had been very impressive at left-back, was replaced shortly before the goal as he limped off.Fulham (4-1-2-1-2): Bettinelli; Zverotic, Bodurov, Burn, Amorebieta (Stafylidis 42); Parker; Christensen, G. Williams; Ruiz; Dembele, Rodallega.Subs: Kiraly, Hutchinson, Roberts, Woodrow, Hyndman, Smith.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Alberta court grants Unifor injunction blocking Suncor from random drug testing

first_imgEDMONTON – A union that represents 3,000 oilsands workers at Suncor Energy sites in northeastern Alberta has won a court injunction against random drug testing.Unifor Local 707-A had argued that random testing would be a violation of workers’ rights and privacy.Calgary-based Suncor (TSX:SU) has said random tests are needed to bolster safety and wanted to start the program this month.In his ruling, Queen’s Bench Justice Paul Belzil said the privacy rights of employees are just as important as safety.“In my view the balance of convenience favours granting the injunction,” Belzil said in a written judgment released Thursday.“The request by Suncor to increase the scope of drug and alcohol testing by implementing random testing would necessarily impact employees who have no drug and alcohol issues and who have not been involved in workplace incidents.”Belzil noted that Suncor already has non-random drug and alcohol testing. He said granting the injunction would not result in an unsafe work environment.He said both parties agree that the Suncor workplace is dangerous, but agree on virtually nothing else.Sneh Seetal, a Suncor spokeswoman, said the company would be filing an immediate and expedited appeal of the injunction ruling.“We are surprised and disappointed by the decision, especially in light of the evidence that we put forward of the pressing safety concerns associated with the ongoing alcohol and drug problems in the workplace in the Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo,” Seetal said from Calgary.“Preventing Suncor from taking steps to address known safety hazards associated with workplace alcohol and drug use is not reasonable.”Ken Smith, president of the union local, said Unifor members are happy with the judge’s decision.“We are very pleased with the ruling and that weight was given to a person’s dignity on the job and that human rights are being upheld for the time being,” he said from Fort McMurray.“Worker safety is the No. 1 priority here.”Suncor and the union have been battling over random drug tests since 2012. Unifor has sought leave to appeal an earlier court ruling to the Supreme Court of Canada.Belzil said if leave to appeal is granted, both sides should co-operate to resolve the case as quickly as possible.If the high court decides not to hear the case, Suncor and Unifor should go to arbitration, he suggested.Suncor presented evidence in court last month that 59 union employees have tested positive for alcohol or drugs over the last four years.The company said drugs — including marijuana, ecstasy, cannabis resin, cocaine, crack cocaine, methamphetamine — and prescription pills such as oxycodone have been found at Suncor operations and work camps.The company’s oilsands projects around Fort McMurray operate 24 hours a day, every day of the year. Employees work 12-hour shifts operating some of the biggest and most complicated industrial equipment in the world.last_img read more

Kristaps Porzingis Is Doing His Best Carmelo Anthony Impression

Jamal Crawford43.9243.52 Porzingis has vaulted up the bad-shot leaderboardLowest-ranked players in quantified Shot Quality (qSQ) in 2017-18 and how those players ranked a year ago “The stars in this league take tougher shots because defenses are focused on them. He’s 22, he’s going through that for the first time, and teams are gearing up on him, and not letting him spin or get a clear opportunity to pass the ball,” Knicks coach Jeff Hornacek told me before a recent game.Without Anthony to worry about, defenses have aggressively seized on Porzingis. A little more than halfway through the season, he’s already been double-teamed in the post 79 times (about twice a game), the fourth-highest total in the NBA and more than he faced during his first two seasons combined, according to Second Spectrum. This effectively is a way of daring him to make a quick, accurate pass to the right man — which is not his strength.Video Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/passes.mp400:0000:0000:52Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Porzingis turns the ball over nearly twice as often as he records an assist, and averages fewer assists per game than any of the other players who rank among the NBA’s top 10 in post-ups. If opponents don’t double him, they will often crowd him on the catch, force him to put the ball on the floor, and bring a help defender so he’s forced to see two bodies.Video Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/kpreel.mp400:0000:0001:08Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.The latter strategy, in particular, has worked well since Porzingis still lacks the physicality he needs to push some defenders — even small guards, who give up 6 or 7 inches — off their square.In theory, you could argue that Porzingis is better equipped to take the sorts of shots Anthony did because of how much taller he is, giving him clearer looks at the basket. But despite being the NBA’s tallest player,2He’s tied with Detroit’s Boban Marjanovic — a FiveThirtyEight favorite — who doesn’t see regular playing time. Porzingis’s midrange jumpers have been blocked more often than anyone else in the league. (Anthony is tied for third.) The budding star has an unusually low average release point of just over 9 feet on his midrange attempts, the third-lowest among the league’s 46 volume shooters,3This included players who’d taken at least 100 midrange attempts at the time of publication. according to an analysis run by senior data analyst Matt Scott of STATS SportVU at FiveThirtyEight’s request.Porzingis is the first to acknowledge that he began rushing his offense too much after the blistering pace he set to begin the season. “I think now I’m starting to realize it doesn’t need to be that way,” he told ESPN’s Ian Begley. “I can just let the game flow and see what happens. I can make the right play and not force and try to get those numbers.”No one would be foolish enough to write off Porzingis at this juncture, for his Melo-like shot selection or any other reason. This is his first year as the primary option — he wasn’t even the second banana last season, when both Anthony and Derrick Rose averaged more shot attempts per game — and aside from Tim Hardaway, Jr.,4Whose month-and-a-half-long absence coincided with Porzingis’s slump. he has no other teammate that qualifies as a true playmaker. He plays within the offense more than Anthony did. (Almost two-thirds of Porzingis’s 2-point baskets are assisted, while just under a third of Anthony’s 2-pointers in New York were.) And Porzingis provides enormous value as a rim protector, even when he’s not doing well on offense.Similar to Anthony, Porzingis can be lethal when teammates get him the ball in scenarios that allow him to make quick decisions off the catch. Hornacek’s best weapon to do that — playing Porzingis at center as part of a five-out lineup — deserves more spin, and would help things flow a bit more. Outside of that, the Knicks have been good at setting up these looks in transition, when Porzingis is trailing a play and can simply square up to shoot from the top of the key. Porzingis posts a whopping 56.7 percent effective field-goal rate when he shoots within two seconds of getting the ball, a rate that puts him in the same stratosphere as Kevin Durant or Anthony Davis as far as efficiency is concerned. But he becomes the equivalent of one of the two or three worst shooters in basketball, around 40 percent, when he attempts a shot after holding it for any more than two seconds. (More evidence of this: his 0.73 points per possession in one-on-one situations rank last among the 33 NBA players who isolate at least twice a game.5And have played at least 20 games.)New York’s made an effort to run plays for Porzingis — they run about 19 off-ball screens for him per 100 possessions, according to Second Spectrum, up from 10 last year — though it doesn’t always result in a touch, because of all the defensive attention he’s facing. “Even if I’m not open, it means someone else is open,” Porzingis said. “When we’re in movement, those are good plays for us.”This maturation process — figuring out how to create separation when defenses load up on a single player — was the one Anthony spent the most time helping Porzingis with early in his career.The pair often played one-on-one at practice, and every couple minutes, Porzingis would stop the game to ask Anthony for advice with certain moves. “[Working with him] has been fun,” Anthony told me back in 2015. “For me, it’s knowing that one day I’ll be gone, and somebody else will be here. And he’s the future.”For New York’s future to be brighter than its cloudy past, they’ll need Porzingis to navigate this stretch and learn how to find better shots than the ones Anthony feasted on as a Knick. Kristaps Porzingis45.6448.871 Jarrett Jack*44.83—— When the Knicks finally traded Carmelo Anthony last offseason, both he and the organization itself viewed it as an opportunity to get out from under a cloud. With the Oklahoma City deal, Melo joined a contending team that already had two All-Stars and left the club that fumbled his prime — one that then gladly handed the keys to the franchise to 22-year-old Kristaps Porzingis.For awhile, that experiment was going swimmingly. Porzingis averaged 30 points per contest through his first 11 outings of the season, a highly impressive, if clearly unsustainable, rate. Yet that hot start to the campaign probably camouflaged something that’s come into clearer focus as both the big man and his team have cooled down: For all the trouble New York went through to move on from Anthony and his ball-dominant tendencies, Porzingis launches many of the same heavily contested shots that prompted so much head-scratching and frustration among Knicks fans.Video Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/badshots.mp400:0000:0001:49Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Going into the Knicks’ nationally televised game in Utah Friday, Porzingis has taken far more heavily contested jumpshots than any other NBA player this season. The majority of those attempts come from the antiquated midrange part of the floor, where New York continues to take more shots than any other team despite the firing of team president Phil Jackson, who insisted on using an unpopular triangle offense. Porzingis takes more than seven shots a game from midrange, the NBA’s second-highest mark; more than Anthony, who considers that area his sweet spot. Perhaps most eye-opening of all: according to Second Spectrum data, Porzingis is tied for the league’s fourth-lowest1Among those who’ve taken at least 300 shots for the season. quantified Shot Quality (qSQ), which measures the likelihood of a shot going in if taken by an average player. To put that into context, last season, Porzingis ranked 71st-lowest in the NBA by this measure, while Anthony had the NBA’s fourth-lowest shot quality profile during 2016-17.In other words: Kristaps Porzingis’s shot selection has essentially morphed into Carmelo Anthony’s. PlayerShot QualityRank (lowest)Shot QualityRank (lowest) DeMar DeRozan43.8%142.2%1 Devin Booker45.6546.012 * No rank for 2016-17 due to injuryqSQ measures the likelihood of a shot going in if taken by an average player; minimum 300 shots.Source: Second Spectrum 2017-182016-17 read more

Home sweet home Buckeye finds success on ice with Jackets

Success in Columbus is nothing new for Blue Jackets forward R.J. Umberger. Most recently, the former member of the Ohio State men’s hockey team showed his playmaking ability during opening night of the most anticipated season in franchise history.“It’s a joy to play in front of these people with all my friends and family,” Umberger said.“When you’re happy off the ice and you’re excited to come to the rink, you can do big things.”The All-American Buckeye got the sold-out crowd on its feet after scoring the Jackets’ first goal of the season in the second period. Columbus went on to defeat the Minnesota Wild, 2-1, Saturday night at Nationwide Arena.The second-year Blue Jacket broke Minnesota’s back defensive line on its power play before faking left, shooting right and sneaking the puck between Wild goaltender Niklas Backstrom’s legs for a 1-0 Columbus lead.“It’s just kind of the pressure we were trying to put on them when we were short-handed,” Umberger said. “‘Verm’ [Antoine Vermette] made a good play on the board and we flooded it with me coming over. I was able to get loose and I went post-to-post with it and was able to get it through his legs.”                                  The short-handed goal was Umberger’s 76th score in his fourth season in the NHL. Last year, he led the Jackets with nine power play goals and ranked second in goals.“Our motto and the way we play has got to be hard with 60-minutes style hockey,” Umberger said. “Execution for the first game probably wasn’t the best, but sometimes you can outwork your opponent … that’s what we’re about. The goal really put a lot of pressure on their top line. If we keep guys off the board, we have a chance to win those types of games.”Jacket’s coach Ken Hitchcock told the media after opening night that the 27-year-old will make plays for the team whenever he gets the chance, especially when he is alongside veteran players such as forwards Samuel Pahlsson and Jason Chimera.“R.J. is going to get 25 or 30 [goals], no matter who he plays with or where he plays,” Hitchcock said. “He’s going to the net, he’s driving to the net. They could have had four or five tonight with that line. If they play their game, they’re not going to be easy to play against because when you got foot speed, skill and size, and you can bring it like that group can, it’s a good sign.”Umberger did big things at Ohio State, too. In his three-year Buckeye career, Umberger posted 129 points, tied for 31st in the OSU record book.He was named the Central Collegiate Hockey Association Rookie of the Year in 2001 and was the highest draft pick out of Ohio State. The Vancouver Canucks selected him with the 16th overall pick in 2001.As a former Buckeye, Umberger said the support he has received in Columbus had a positive impact on his game.“It does make a difference sometimes when you’re happy where you’re at and comfortable off the ice, you can come to the rink with a smile,” Umberger said, who signed a four-year contract with Columbus in 2008. “I have great teammates here and I’m just happy to be a part of a great group.”During his college years, Umberger said he imagined what it would be like to suit up for the then-new Columbus Blue Jackets franchise.“You don’t know what’s going to happen with your future as a college hockey player,” Umberger said. “One day when I was at Ohio State, I wanted to play here and hoped that someday I could.”For Umberger, Buckeye dreams do come true. read more

Lazio acknowledge Spurs interest in Savic and Immobile

first_imgThere have been a lot of rumours going around for Lazio’s now infamous duo Sergej Milinkovic-Savic and Ciro Immobile’s transfer to a Premier League side.However, it seems their sporting director Igli Tare is not so interested in selling them, or at least this is what it looks like, judging by his reaction.Lazio have been trying to catch up and secure a Champions League spot for the next season. The manager Simone Inzaghi has been the main reason the team has been thriving and not just the team as a whole, but players individually as well.Ciro Immobile, ItalyCiro Immobile relieved to end Italy goal-drought Andrew Smyth – September 9, 2019 Striker Ciro Immobile was a relieved man after finally ending his two-year Italy goal-drought during Sunday’s 2-1 win over Finland.Milinkovic-Savic joined Lazio in 2015 and has been able to blossom into one of Europe’s most perspective youngsters right now. He has scored 13 goals and provided 6 assists. Also, the fact that he is 1.91m tall is not to be forgotten either.Immobile, who has spent time in Torino, Borussia Dortmund and Sevilla, has been able to score the amazing 41 goals in 46 games – following Salah pretty closely.“€130 million offer for Milinkovic and Immobile? I do not read the newspapers and I do not listen to the radio, because we are concentrated only on the field,” was Igli Tare’s reaction when asked for the duo, according to HITC.last_img read more