Dental Hygiene Adjunct Faculty Pool

first_imgBachelor’s Degree in Dental HygieneTwo years of teaching experience in Dental HygieneTwo years of clinical experience in Dental Hygiene within thelast 3 yearsCurrent Licensure [or eligibility] in the state of MD as adental hygienistCurrent CPR certification [American Heart Association]Annual PPD [tuberculin] testingPreferred QualificationsPreferred Qualifications: Description/Job SummaryAn Adjunct Faculty in Dental Hygiene is responsiblefor:1. Based on master syllabus, design and teach assigned classsession(s), leveraging digital content and multi-media resources inthe classroom.2. Assess student engagement/understanding during each classsession and throughout the semester3. Collect, grade, and report assignments and homework4. Maintain and update the syllabus and course materials andmake sure they are available through the College’s LearningManagement System5. Advise learners in ways to help them meet theireducational goals6. Use a variety of strategies to assess and evaluatelearning.7. Provide timely, thoughtful and constructive feedback tolearnersEmployees in this classification receive supervision from theAssociate Dean of Nursing.Required QualificationsMinimum Qualifications : Master’s Degree in Dental HygieneFive years of teaching experiencelast_img read more

Election’s confusing pro-life choice

first_imgYesterday’s OUSU VP Women byelection was mired in controversy as it emerged that one of the two candidates had not mentioned her anti-abortion links on her manifesto. Lucy Underwood, one of the two candidates for the post, is the current President of the Oxford Pro- Life Society, whose stated aim is “to campaign around Oxford for the protection of human life”. However the role of VP Women involves “producing the Unplanned Pregnancy: Your Options pack and overseeing the work of OUSU’s Promoting Choice Committee” as well as always being “available to see students to give confidential nondirective welfare support, particularly on pregnancy”. Ms Underwood, who has not been involved in political campaigns on any issue apart from antiabortion before, mentions cutting student numbers and post-exam celebrations on her manifesto but fails to mention her Pro-Life role. Her only mention of pregnancy came under the title “Choice and free speech for women” where she said that “the pregnancy advisory handbook and OUSU counselling services should be open to all legal organisations who wish to advertise.” It is thought this was a reference to OUSU’s long-standing policy not to allow the anti-abortion organisation Life to advertise in the pregnancy advisory handbook on the grounds that it provides directional advice. At hustings Ms Underwood claimed her Pro-Life links were irrelevant and that OUSU should not take a “political line” on the issue. She did explain to Cherwell that she had declared her Pro-Life role on her nomination form and had no duty to mention it on the manifesto. She explained that she hoped to be able “to provide all the choices” to Oxford’s women. Bex Wilkinson, Ms Underwood’s competitor and a former OUSU Council Delegate and Executive Member, states quite openly on her manifesto that she has been a Pro- Choice Officer and is endorsed by former Pro-Choice Officers. Wilkinson won by a landslide majority.ARCHIVE: 2nd week TT 2004last_img read more

Boat race inspires Chelsea garden

first_imgAn exhibition at this year’s Chelsea flower show has been created to celebrate the 175th Anniversary of the Oxford and Cambridge boat race. The Stonemarket Boat Race Anniversary Garden, designed by Bunny Guiness, will be sunk 60cm (2ft) below ground level so visitors can look down on the racethemed design which is based on the rivalry between the ‘two blues’.ARCHIVE: 4th week TT 2004last_img

Comment: Entertainment at the Oxford Union

first_imgIn the interests of full disclosure, I should probably mention that I am not a member of the Oxford Union. Amid the blur of Freshers’ Week, I remember looking at the hordes of other Freshers rushing toward Frewin Court with their life membership forms, determined to check that box on their bucket list of ‘Oxford experiences’. Despite the alluring thought that membership would transport me into the hallowed chambers of ‘the world’s most famous debating society’, and the prospect of hearing a long train of undoubtedly glittering personalities speak in the flesh, the thought of coughing up £190 was simply quite unappetizing. Besides, I surmised that the real appeal of the Union lay in the unmatched entertainment value of its bigger-than-Broadway antics, an appeal as easily appreciated from outside the aforementioned hallowed chambers as from inside. Three years on, the entertainment value has, if anything, become even clearer. I was, for example, delighted when I chanced on the Union’s bold foray into multimedia, in the form of its Freshers’ DVD. This masterpiece of marketing, which can now be viewed on YouTube, features hilarious personal sales’ pitches by three Union luminaries, who all achieve the miraculous feat of talking while maintaining implausibly wide grins. One of them even describes the Purple Turtle as an ‘exclusive nightclub’ with what sounds like utter conviction. But that is not all. As the video draws to a close and the telemarketing drone of the voice-over urges Freshers to sign up for membership, we are treated to a shot of Krishna Omkar leaving the Union in what appears to be the world’s shortest and whitest shorts. Initially, I thought the inclusion of this image was quite inexplicable, but I soon came to see it as the cherry on the top of this tour de force of postmodern ironic self-parody. Which brings us, of course, to the latest twist in the thriller. After last term’s President and his Eine Kleine Nachtracismus, I would have thought that the antics would abate, if only temporarily. But it was not to be. For at Frewin Court, the show must go on. Of course, the ‘crisis’ surrounding the overturning of last term’s elections is old news now, but I’d like to draw your attention to some hidden gems in the story which you might have missed. I was enchanted to learn, for one, that an appeal had been lodged with the tribunal on the grounds that its decision was ‘founded on an error of law’ and breached ‘any of the principles of natural justice’. Like most of you, up to that point I remained unaware that the dress-up games at the Union included pretending to be arguing landmark cases before the European Court of Human Rights. But – aha! – apparently the tribunal that hears allegations of electoral malpractice always has one member who is a qualified lawyer. It seems these events are not in fact elaborate entertainments put on for our amusement, but Very Serious and Professional Matters. This unusual sobriety was reflected in the Returning Officer’s Jeffersonian declaration of principles: ‘The democratic election of Officers is a fundamental principle which underpins all for which this Society stands.’ It seems every term we learn of a new fundamental principle of this illustrious Society – once free speech, now democracy; these people are really fighting the good fight. To call this entertainment, then, would be flippant. Yet a doubt still lingers. Surely when I had hoped for bigger-than-Broadway, my optimism was not unfounded? Surely this deluded sense of purpose and importance is the foundation on which this entire Theatre of the Absurd is built? The best thing to do, both for our own sanity and theirs, is to play along. As this ‘crisis’ rumbles on, the curtains at Frewin Court will still rise tonight, every night, sit back, relax, and don’t forget the standing-O at the end. by Caleb Yonglast_img read more

Video: Kitchen fire closes Wagamama

first_imgThe city centre has been hit by its second fire in two days, after a kitchen blaze caused extensive damage to Wagamama in the early hours of Friday morning. Fire crews were called at 5.40am and Market Street cordoned off after delivery men saw smoke in the building.  Five engines attended, as well as a specialist rescue unit who helped gain access to the restaurant.   Incident Commander Paul Molloy said that there was extensive damage to the kitchen area and smoke damage to the rest of the building.  “Things were complicated by the fact that the fire was in a concealed space,” he said.   “Now we just want to make sure that everything is safe.”   The fire is believed to be accidental and unrelated to a blaze that damaged the facade of Schuh on Magdalen Street yesterday .  There were no injuries in either incident.   Wagamama opened in September and is not expected to be back in action until the end of the month.last_img read more

Mood nightclub to be closed

first_imgMood Music Cocktail Bar, a George Street nightspot, is to be forced to close following the revocation of its licence by the Oxford City Council.A hearing was called after a woman was attacked with a broken bottle in the venue two weeks ago, suffering injuries to her face. The injuries required hospitalisation and stitches.The incident occurred despite the fact that Mood agreed to switch from glass to plastic in March to conform to licensing conditions. The agreed changes were never enacted and the licence holder, Adel El-Baghdadi, was not notified. It is thought that the mistake occurred due to a managerial changeover. Since its last review 32 reported crimes have taken place at the club, including numerous thefts and nine assaults.Mr El-Baghdadi is appealing the decision. The Cocktail Bar will remain open until the appeal finishes.last_img read more

Exeter JCR committee sing ‘Call Me Maybe’

first_imgLast Sunday evening, the members of Exeter’s JCR committee performed an a cappella version of Carly Rae Jepson’s ‘Call Me Maybe’ to a 50-strong audience.Last Sunday evening, the members of Exeter’s JCR committee performed an a cappella version of Carly Rae Jepson’s ‘Call Me Maybe’ to a 50-strong audience.Following a motion passed in the first week of Trinity, Exeter’s JCR committee is constitutionally required to perform Carly Rae Jepson’s “Call Me Maybe” before the start of every meeting.The motion was proposed at the first JCR meeting of term by second year classicist Ronan Magee and passed with a resounding majority.A friendly amendment to the motion called for Magee to be included in the proposals.Mr Magee and members of Exeter’s JCR committee’s rendition of ‘Call Me Maybe’ at the start of Sunday’s meeting was accompanied by two randomly chosen audience members who were asked to act out the lyrics of the song. Their performance was greeted with loud cheers by audience members.Mr Magee described the motion as ‘an important move.”“Had it not been for the utter tunelessness of our singing, I would be urging its extension to all JCRs as a mark of respect for this seminal song,” he added.When Mr Magee first suggested the motion, JCR President Benjamin Clayton said his first thought was, “This is crazy.”“After all I had only just met him and he was wearing ripped jeans and his skin was showing,”  Clayton explained. “But since it was constitutional I threw a wish in the well and went on my way to sing the song.” When one JCR member attempted to leave the meeting in order to avoid singing, Clayton promptly demanded, “Where do you think you’re going baby?”He added “The exec sang with nothing less than star quality. At the end of the night I was approached by someone from Out of The Blue, who was so impressed with my performance that he asked me to call him, maybe.’Following a motion passed in the first week of Trinity, Exeter’s JCR committee is constitutionally required to perform the song before the start of every meeting.The motion was proposed at the first JCR meeting of term by second year classicist Ronan Magee and passed with a resounding majority.A friendly amendment to the motion called for Magee to be included in the proposals.Mr Magee and members of Exeter’s JCR committee’s rendition of ‘Call Me Maybe’ at the start of Sunday’s meeting was accompanied by two randomly chosen audience members who were asked to act out the lyrics of the song. Their performance was greeted with loud cheers by audience members.Mr Magee described the motion as ‘an important move.”He added, “Had it not been for the utter tunelessness of our singing, I would be urging its extension to all JCRs as a mark of respect for this seminal song.’When Mr Magee first suggested the motion, JCR President Benjamin Clayton said his first thought was, “This is crazy.”“After all I had only just met him and he was wearing ripped jeans and his skin was showing,” Clayton explained, “But since it was constitutional I threw a wish in the well and went on my way to sing the song.” When one JCR member attempted to leave the meeting in order to avoid singing, Clayton promptly demanded, “Where do you think you’re going baby?”He added “The exec sang with nothing less than star quality. At the end of the night I was approached by someone from Out of The Blue, who was so impressed with my performance that he asked me to call him, maybe.’last_img read more

Financial Times investigation slams Christ Church as “virtually ungovernable”

first_img“The notion that a small cabal of anti-Dean Dons can censor the Tribunal’s report is an attempt at self-serving protection for themselves because they are severely criticised in the Appendices of the report.” Although details of the affair have been hard to come by, the report goes into detail and contains extensive comment from members of the college’s administration and academic body, largely anonymous, as well as figures from other colleges. The dean himself is reported to have spent £400,000 of his own money on his defence. When Percy’s predecessor as Dean, Christopher Lewis, was asked whether he felt overworked in the role, he said, “No. You were busy.” According to the investigation, the Dean is perceived to be part of the “dwindling talent pool” within the Church, and “a low-key figure compared to the distinguished academics and civil servants who headed many other colleges” by fellows. An investigation by the Financial Times into the ongoing dispute between the governing body of Christ Church and the Dean, The Very Reverend Martyn Percy, criticizes both parties heavily. The investigation contains details about the current environment within college. It reports academics breaking down in tears over the dispute, the Dean refusing to attend meetings with certain people present, and clerical staff watching who sits with who at dinner as a way of determining loyalties. The investigation concurs with the recent complaint made by former Conservative minister Jonathan Aitken to the Charity Commission which criticised the college for spending up to £2 mil- lion on the case. One anonymous source said: “I go around hoping I won’t meet some people… If I meet them, we stare straight ahead so we don’t look at one another.” The Charity Commission replied with a statement of their own, saying, “We can confirm that we told the trustees of Christ Church to undertake a review of the charity’s governance.” “We are aware that numerous inaccurate and misleading comments have been made in recent weeks, but unfortunately we are not in a position to address these at this time as it would be inappropriate to comment before the independent review has concluded.” The investigation argues that the crisis which has swept Christ Church over the past year began with the Dean’s request for a salary rise, including a threat to adjust his availability and skip a fundraising tour to the United States. “It would be morally pusillanimous to go along with the cabal’s redaction attempt.” Christ Church gave Cherwell a statement in response, which said, “All at Christ Church are focused on the work of the College and Cathedral and are committed to its future success. As part of this, Christ Church is currently embarking on an independent review of its governance arrangements, and we will be working closely with the Charity Commission during this process.” “It is good practice for all charities to undertake such a review from time to time. We will not be involved in the review directly, but we expect the trustees to report to us on its outcome.” For his part, Percy cast himself as overworked and underappreciated. He said in an email that the college has a “culture of unpleasantness” and that “I have not received the smallest hint — not even a single sentence — of gratitude for my work”. Mr Aitken was critical of the attempt to withhold details of the dispute from the public, telling Cherwell, “Like many members of the Christ Church Alumni Association, I regard it as a scandal of governance that the full Govern- ing Body of the College has been refused sight of a full, unredacted copy of the Tribunal’s findings and reasons for clearing the Dean of all charges.”last_img read more

5G mast to be built in Oxford

first_img5Gnetworks are capable of transferring data at speeds approximately ten to twentytimes faster than the fastest current offered by 4G mobile networks. This wouldallow someone with a 5G compatible device to download a high definition film inabout a minute. The large amounts of data transfer that 5G enables could oneday help to power technologies such as fully autonomous cars or remote surgeryvia robots. This past week, the Oxford City Council approvedCornerstone’s plan to build a 5G mast on the corner of Old Road and WindmillRoad, near the Nuffield Orthopedic Centre in Headington. “We have 5G coverage in more places than anyone in the UK, and we remain focused on connecting many more areas this year and beyond.” “Delivering the best movable experience for our customers has never been more important,” said Marc Allera, chief executive of BT’s consumer business which owns EE. “Our 5G rollout continues apace, with our engineers building and upgrading new sites every day to bring the latest mobile technology to even more people in the places they need it. More data is consumed every year and so the spectrum bands currently in place are becoming congested, which leads to breakdowns in service. Other 5G masts have been built, mostly across east Oxford, in recent months. The planning development reflects the drive among telecommunication companies such as O2, EE, and Cornerstone to establish a presence in the county as providers of the next generation of mobile internet connection. center_img Oxford is one of 12 towns and cities where EE have recently rolled out 5G, alongside Blackpool and Aberdeen. Brendan O’Reilly, O2’s chief technology officer, told the BBC: “It’s vital we continue to invest in new innovations and technologies to keep Britain mobile and connected.” Accordingto data from EE, the main usage of its 5G network has been video streaming andsocial networking. EE’s increasing expansion of its 5G coverage comes inanticipation of Apple’s rollout of the iPhone 12 with 5G compatibility. Image credit to Diermaier / 61 bilder / Pixabaylast_img read more

Vectren Finalizes Plan For Beneficial Reuse For Coal Ash Pond Excavation And Recycling

first_img Vectren, a CenterPoint Energy company, today announced as part of its ongoing sustainability efforts, ponded coal ash from its southwestern Indiana generating station, A.B. Brown, will be excavated and recycled for beneficial reuse. This partnership is a result of the federally mandated Coal Combustion Residuals Rule (CCR) requiring certain compliance measures for the long-term closure plans of coal ash ponds.This week, Vectren filed an application with the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission (IURC) to recover the costs associated with the ash pond remediation. The company will soon begin construction of the infrastructure needed to transport the coal ash to the Ohio River for transport by the manufacturer that will reuse the ash. The material that can be beneficially reused will be removed from the site, thereby greatly reducing future cost and environmental risk compared to alternatives that would leave all the ash on Vectren’s property.“This partnership with the manufacturer is an ideal solution – the material is removed from the environment, it will be used for beneficial purposes, and the cost to customers will be less than other viable compliance options,” said Lynnae Wilson, chief business officer, Indiana Electric. “Vectren’s decision to recycle the ponded coal ash reduces the impact on the environment and allows for the safe clean closure of the A.B. Brown coal ash pond.”Vectren signed a multi-year agreement for the excavation, conversion and recycling of up to six million tons of ponded ash, a by-product of coal-fired generation, beginning in 2021. Since 2009, Vectren has been shipping dry fly ash from A.B. Brown, F.B. Culley and Warrick coal plants for use as a raw material in cement manufacturing. Forward Looking StatementThis news release includes forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. When used in this news release, the words “anticipate,” “believe,” “continue,” “could,” “estimate,” “expect,” “forecast,” “goal,” “intend,” “may,” “objective,” “plan,” “potential,” “predict,” “projection,” “should,” “target,” “will” or other similar words are intended to identify forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements are based upon assumptions of management which are believed to be reasonable at the time made and are subject to significant risks and uncertainties. Actual events and results may differ materially from those expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements. Any statements in this news release regarding future events, such as the company’s anticipated closure plan for the excavation and recycling of coal ash, including infrastructure construction related thereto, future cost impacts on the company and its customers and expectations regarding the company’s future environmental risk profile, regulatory filings and decisions on those filings, legislative actions or requirements, and any other statements that are not historical facts are forward-looking statements. Each forward-looking statement contained in this news release speaks only as of the date of this release. Factors that could affect actual results include the timing and impact of future regulatory and legislative decisions, effects of competition, weather variations, changes in business plans, financial market conditions and other factors discussed in CenterPoint Energy’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2018, CenterPoint Energy’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarters ended March 31, 2019 and June 30, 2019 and other reports CenterPoint Energy or its subsidiaries may file from time to time with the Securities and Exchange Commission. FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more